Biography

RWP was born in Manchester, in the north of England, in the late 1950s, so he is very old. He really liked the north of England, which by 1965 was hip and had three TV channels, and where he went to a coed school. His parents, for reasons best known to themselves, then yanked him away, to Belfast and then Dublin, which had one TV channel that started up at 6 pm with the Angelus (Catholic call to prayer). He also had to go to an all boys school, where he realized he really missed girls. This probably let him focus on schoolwork, though, and at age 19, after he had finished college, he set off for America, where he still resides. He has a bachelors degree in biochemistry and a Ph.D. from Harvard in biophysics, and has lived also in Mainz, Germany, Setauket NY, and Richland WA. He currently divides his time between Nebraska, Rosslyn VA, and Florida.

Thursday, July 16, 2015

Deborah Nucatola and the moral sense.

Humans have an innate moral sense, that transcends religion, or culture, or education. We (most of us) are born with it. This is not up for debate; it's the conclusion of thousands of scientifc studies. Deny it, and you're equivalent to a creationist or denier of global warming.

Two very important parts of the moral sense are protectiveness towards babies and children, and a sense of disgust and fear of contamination. (There is an actual scientific debate about whether the latter two are separate.) Our protectiveness towards children is very much an evolutionary product of our being social animals. It's triggered by big eyes, big heads, small bodies, etc.. For example, in contrast to us, male lions slaughter the offspring of other male lions. As any biologist will tell you, there's little difference between a 22-week fetus and a newborn anyway; a breathing reflex, perhaps, and a change in blood flow that happens on birth. But, more innately, when we look at a 22-week gestational age human being in a preemie nursery, our brains see it as a baby, and our protective instinct is triggered. Light-hearted chatter about crushing the bodies of late term fetuses disturbs us, and it should. It's completely natural we feel that way. Blather all you want about it not being a baby; your brain knows better.

Now compound this protectiveness with disgust and fear of contamination, which exists, among other things, to protect us from eating bad food. There's a reason why we say 'not while I'm eating lunch' in response to disgusting stories. Watching conversation about dismembering babies, while the speaker is eating lunch, sets off two alarms. If it doesn't disturb you, you're probably a sociopath. And we don't like sociopaths, because we rtightly fear and shun people who don't have instincts that allow them to live peaceably with others.

So people who shake their heads at the 'ick' factor here are simply blind and ignorant; they are denying who we are.

Interestingly, research -- a lot of it done here are UNL -- shows conservatives tend to react more intensely to disgust (and conversely, disgust tends to make people more conservative). And liberals tend to be more protective, which is why they hate fetal pictures. This tape manages to trigger all of us.

Libertarians and liberals tend to argue we can transcend our innate moral sense, where it doesn't squae with our rationally based ethics. Peter Singer, for example, argues that if newborns and late term fetuses are essentially the same (and they are) we should be able to kill newborns just as we perform late-term abortions. Libertarians sometimes argue our incest taboo (another part of the moral sense, linked to disgust) makes no sense applied to sex between consenting adults who can't conceive deformed children, such as same-sex and infertile siblings. They're pissing into the wind.

Conservatives, on the other hand, argue that the moral sense is incredibly important. We humans are simply not smart enough to do complex ethical calculus on the fly. We need a moral instinct, just as we need an instict that lets us figure out the flight of a baseball, and can't just integrate Newton's equations of motion, as a computer would.

We trifle with this stuff at our peril. There's no evidence our moral sense is a cafeteria from which we can pick and choose.

1 comment:

  1. Perhaps one difference between a fetus and a baby is that someone other than the mother can offer to take over care of a baby. I don't think we have the right to tell someone else what to do unless we are willing and able to accept responsibility for any associated burdens.

    But you are right, nobody who is mentally healthy would prefer abortion to contraception.

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